Kenny Everett – the early days

The unveiling today of a plaque to mark Kenny Everett’s flat – I assume it’s the one in Earl’s Court – prompts me to unearth this letter, which he wrote for my largely unread music and pirate radio column in my cub reporter days at the Gravesend edition of the Kent Messenger. It’s undated, but as it’s winter it would be late 1966-early 1967. Not too much zaniness, but it gives an insight into his departure and return to Radio London, which would herald similar frustrations at Radio 1. Rather than re-type it all, I’m hoping these scans work on their own. And a very stylish signature may I say. We loved him then and we love him still. No music radio will ever match the atmosphere, uncertainty, excitement and of course the music from the North Sea.

Kenny Everett 1 Kenny Everett 2 Kenny Everett 3 everett

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9 Responses to Kenny Everett – the early days

  1. Pingback: Kenny Everett – the early days | vinylmemories

  2. Michael Heatley says:

    Absolutely fabulous darling – thanks for sharing!

    Like

  3. dhvinyl says:

    Entirely my pleasure.

    Like

  4. Paul Rusling says:

    Really enjoyed reading that David – it really is high time you wrote that book about your own thrilling career, especially the Disc 7 M E days, and adorned with pictures of Penny Valentine! My money is ready.

    Like

  5. Mike Terry says:

    Wonderful, such a well written and sensible letter, timeless.

    Like

  6. Andy Pell says:

    Great to read that letter, As Paul says you should write a book.

    Like

  7. dhvinyl says:

    Well, nearly a year later and a mini flurry of nice comments – thanks. They will spur me to return to this subject which made such an impact on us 50 years ago. Watch this space, and please don’t talk about writing a book – you’ve hit a nerve, but you’ve highlighted the need for me to once again try and blog more often.

    Like

  8. Tim Arnold says:

    A good insight into Ev’s thoughts at the time. An historical treasure. Thanks for sharing. Without the internet, this letter would have vanished.

    Like

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